The Projections of ‘Self’ on Social Media Platforms

Think of all the places you upload photos- of your food, your family, your pet, or yourself.
Facebook? Instagram? Twitter? Tumblr? Snapchat?

Now think-
Is there a difference in the type of photos you choose to upload to their respective platforms?

Each platform has a specific and different function, role and audience. Each is popular for its own reason.

I can’t speak for you, but I know I get stressed when I see that notification –

Facebook

– someone has tagged you in a photo

Why? Why does that make me nervous?

For me it’s because I am very aware of the fact I use my social media for different purposes. And that on those platforms I have very different audiences.

Twitter

And if someone else is uploading an image I don’t have the ability to control my image; or the perception others will have in the response to my image. It means that I constantly review the images I am tagged in; and it means that more often than not I remove my tag from images that I haven’t put up.

Doing a media degree means that I know all too well the visibility of the images we create for ourselves on the internet. And it doesn’t matter how anonymous we think we are keeping ourselves, the internet is a very public sphere. Recent history has shown the effects a resurfaced photo can have on lives.

Regardless of the debate surrounding the idea of ‘authentic self’ I think the true message should be;

Keep your online identity(s) true to yourself.

Cooler

You can hide behind what seems like an ‘internet alter ego’ but it as much a part of you as any other part of your life.

Search History

Regardless of the excuses and justifications we place on our internet behaviour, those actions are our own.

Benefits

And that internet username, irrespective of your attempts at distancing yourself from that self, is still you.

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One thought on “The Projections of ‘Self’ on Social Media Platforms

  1. This is a really interesting post. I think the idea of your ‘internet alter ego’ being as much a part of you as your offline identity is a really interesting one. I think most people try and portray themselves in the best light, as their best selves. However, I agree with you that people have difficulty controlling their online image if other people also have some control over it. The idea that anyone can post anything is both an opportunity and a risk that could be to your detriment.

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